Community Intervention Network for Diabetes and Depression (CoIN-DD)

 

Long-term conditions and mental health in Sub-Saharan Africa: mainstreaming community-based practices.

Long-term conditions are increasing rapidly across the globe. In particular, diabetes is becoming more prevalent and is often associated with poor mental health.

We have established the first consortium, the Community Intervention Network for Diabetes and Depression (CoIN-DD), to focus systematically on building evidence and community practice to tackle comorbidity between mental illness and diabetes in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Such comorbidity is increasing rapidly and presents a major challenge to SSA health care provision. Community-based interventions appear to be an efficacious response to this problem. However, evidence to support this is still weak, especially in SSA. This research builds on our existing collaborations which have begun to examine the scope for inclusive and affordable community practice to tackle comorbid diabetes and depression. Our sustainable network of African and UK researchers will:
Generate a greater shared understanding of existing research on the interrelationships between mental health and type 2 diabetes and the role of community engagement in SSA in tackling these challenges;
Identify gaps in current research and practice in SSA countries from a range of disciplinary perspectives and experience;
Develop methodologies for combining research and practice to create and evaluate partnerships with communities for problem identification, decision-making, and shared actions for prevention, treatment, and management of comorbid diabetes and mental health problems;
Support the development and training of early career researchers from SSA;
Create cost-effective networking opportunities for African and UK partners for a long term impact in health research

 

Lead Investigators:

Professor Cathy Lloyd, The Open University –

Dr. Cathy Lloyd is a Professor of Health Studies at The Open University, UK. She has an international reputation for research in the psychosocial field of diabetes. Her research includes work on diabetes and mental health taking an inclusive approach to her work and promoting positive and appropriate language for clinical encounters between people with diabetes, obesity, and health care professionals. She teaches health and social care to undergraduates and supervises a number of doctoral students. Professor Lloyd leads the Community Interventions Network for Diabetes and Depression (CoIN-DD), a collaborative research group for academics, researchers, and clinicians in Kenya, Uganda, Ethiopia, and Tanzania. She is the Project Lead for a global study in 15 countries, the International Prevalence and Treatment of Diabetes and Depression (INTERPRET-DD) Study investigating the prevalence of recognised and unrecognised depression, diabetes-related emotional distress, and the country-specific care pathways that are initiated to treat co-morbid diabetes and depression.

Professor David Ndetei, African Mental Health Research and Training Foundation (http://www.africamentalhealthfoundation.org/)

Supported by the Academy of Medical Sciences Global Challenges Networking Fund.

Watch the webinar:  Language Matters: Supporting Emotional Health in Diabetes Care here: http://stadium.open.ac.uk/stadia/preview.php?whichevent=3545&s=31

Further resources to support language use in clinical encounters with people with diabetes can be found here:

http://www.successfuldiabetes.com/living-with-diabetes/sd-news/item/231-language-matters-webinar-recording